Collected Poems

Collected Poems Taut densely lyrical and everywhere informed by a powerful and subtle music this collection begins with the compact fragments of Spokes and Unearth both written when Auster was in his early twentie

  • Title: Collected Poems
  • Author: Paul Auster
  • ISBN: 9781585679119
  • Page: 124
  • Format: Paperback
  • Collected Poems

    Taut, densely lyrical, and everywhere informed by a powerful and subtle music, this collection begins with the compact fragments of Spokes and Unearth both written when Auster was in his early twenties , continues on through the ample meditations of Wall Writing, Disappearances, Effigies, Fragments From the Cold, Facing the Music and White Spaces, then moTaut, densely lyrical, and everywhere informed by a powerful and subtle music, this collection begins with the compact fragments of Spokes and Unearth both written when Auster was in his early twenties , continues on through the ample meditations of Wall Writing, Disappearances, Effigies, Fragments From the Cold, Facing the Music and White Spaces, then moves further back in time to include Auster s revealing translations of many of the French poets who influenced his own writing including Paul Eluard, Andre Breton, Tristan Tzara, Philippe Soupault, Robert Desnos, and Rene Char as well as the provocative and previously unpublished Notes From a Composition Book 1967 An introduction by Normal Finkelstein connects the biographical elements to a consideration of the work and takes in Auster s early literary and philosophical influences Penetrating, lyric, and tempered with the same brooding intelligence that informs The New York Trilogy, these poems offer a unique window into postmodern consciousness.

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      124 Paul Auster
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      Posted by:Paul Auster
      Published :2018-09-17T17:02:47+00:00

    One thought on “Collected Poems

    1. M. Sarki

      Paul Auster is a very talented man. His poems are well-made and he should be very proud of them. Auster says himself (and is quoted in the introduction) that these artifacts may be seen down the road as his very best work. I was not so enamored with his translations, but I don't think it had anything to do at all with the work Auster did on them. It was important for me to read these poems and I am more impressed with Auster than before. It has enabled a clearer understanding I would not have ha [...]

    2. Matthew

      We dreamthat we do not dream. We wakein the hours of sleepand sleep through the silencethat stands over us. Summerkeeps its promiseby breaking it.- Dictum: After Great DistancesThere's a reason Paul Auster is known for his fiction and not his poetry. Like many writers before him, Auster started in poetry but abandoned the vocation after the success of his New York Trilogy. Having read both, I would sooner recommend his fiction, particularly The New York Trilogy.Anyone curious about Auster's poet [...]

    3. Maarten Buser

      Prima werk, maar had er op basis van Austers proza - dat gewoon goed tot heel goed is - toch wat meer verwacht. Veel thema's die overeenkomen met z'n andere werk - toeval, de relatie tussen taal en wereld, tussen wereld en taal, enzovoort - maar minder sterk uitgewerkt.

    4. Josh

      To paraphrase comedian Dave Hill, I always feel a bit like "a caveman in a spaceship" when I try to write about poetry. That seems fitting for this complete collection of Paul Auster's published poetry, because Auster's subject is the difficulty of translating experience into words. For the last 35 years, Auster has written novels, nonfiction essays, and screenplays and directed a few films, but in the 1970s, he wrote poetry. This book collects all the poems, notes from his sketchbook, his late- [...]

    5. Christian

      As a Auster artistic advocate I've read his ten (twelve)novels and his nonfiction The Invention of Solitude and The Red Notebook. As a novelist and poet myself, I felt an obligation to attempt Auster's poetry.Collected Poems spans a decade of poetry (1970-79)and a few translated French poems of his earlier work as a bonus. From the get-go I can say that his fluid novel and non fiction prose found contrasts with sometimes awkward, soul-searching poetic moments. Yet his mastery of language, intell [...]

    6. The Bookloft

      Bookseller: KarenAuster is my favorite novelist, so I was thrilled to read this comprehensive volume of his prose, musings, notes, and translations of philosopHy. As with most of his work, mystery and logic interplay with a stark yet remarkably lyrical style. He has a sharp and clear vision of topics, issues, and events with complex, myriad layers of emotion and meaning as if he were a "puzzle master" of the human experience. Auster plays with the theme of chance vs. fate--which pervades his lat [...]

    7. Kasandra

      Deeply philosophical, I liked the later poems better than the earlier ones. All of them show a clear French influence, and though they are often intriguing, I found it hard to connect emotionally with Auster's poetry, in contrast to both his fiction and his memoirs. There's surreal imagery here, and a constant struggle to voice what Auster feels cannot truly be voiced. The end result was that I felt suspended in a dreamlike but frustrated state while reading these and afterwards, isolated and ob [...]

    8. Pliyo Senpai

      Magnífico. Lo mejor que me llevo es su forma de evocar la fuerza de la palabra y el silencio, sus imágenes son densas pero esconden cosas, su voz en el poema tiene algo magnético.Hay especialmente uno que me llamó la atención:Nómadahasta que ningún sitio, floreciendoen la cárcel de tu boca, se convierteen allí donde estás:tú leíste la fábulaescrita en la miradadel dado: (era lapalabra-meteoro, garabateada entre nosotrospor la luz, sin embargo al finalno teníamos pruebas, nopudimos [...]

    9. John Williams

      Deeply philosophical, highly influenced by early 20th century French Dada poets, yet always retaining a truly human touch that reminds me a bit of early Mark Strand, I cannot recommend Auster's poetry enough. Though a good portion of his Collected Poems includes fresh translations of the French masters that inspire him, which themselves are often brilliant, Auster's own poetry resonated far deeper with me. I've returned to this book many times over the years.

    10. John

      "Notes from a composition book," the last item in this collection, is more philosophy of art than poetry - it captures an artist grappling with the ideas of Wittgenstein and Merleau-Ponty while reaching for a way to personalize them. This essay informs the rest of the poems in the collection, which makes its placement at the end of the book (rather than the beginning, which would make sense chronologically) the only real criticism I have of an otherwise wonderful collection of writing.

    11. Daniel

      Very dense, very literate poems. Even if you don't understand what's going on at all times (and I certainly didn't; the poems' internal worlds are opaque at best), you can at least appreciate the wildly inventive language.

    12. Allison C. McCulloch

      Read a poem in New York from this book. It had the word "invisible" in it and I'm like "Cool!" cuz he had a book named "Invisible" but it was written way after these poems. Weird! Trippy! But, I'm hesitant to read the rest of the poems, because they seem really boring, but we'll see.

    13. Kimberly

      I wish that I could give this book 2.5 stars. I sincerely loved some of the poems and others were a complete struggle and fell flat for me.

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